HABC - Over 75 Years of Rich History

The Housing Authority of Baltimore City (HABC) is proud of its role and contribution over the past 75 years toward a better Baltimore and better living for all the citizens of the city.

Serving nearly 20,000 residents with an inventory of approximately 11,000 units, HABC's portfolio includes 28 family developments, 19 mixed population buildings, two senior buildings and scattered sites throughout the City.

Timeline: 1937-2013

December 1, 1937: The United States Housing Act of 1937 (Wagner-Steagall Bill) establishes a federally-funded housing program.

December 13, 1937: Mayor Howard W. Jackson establishes the Housing Authority of Baltimore City (HABC) through an ordinance of the Baltimore City Council to build and operate public housing. Today, HABC is the 5th largest public housing authority in the nation.

September 30, 1940: Poe Homes, the first public housing development, opens under the leadership of HABC Executive Director C. W. Perkins

October 30, 1941: Douglass Homes opens

October 31, 1941: McCulloh Homes opens

November 30, 1941: Latrobe Homes opens

March 31, 1942: Fairfield opens

March 31, 1942: Fairfield opens; the development was raised in 1997 as part of the Thompson Consent Decree

June 29, 1942: Perkins Homes opens

September 29, 1942: Gilmor Homes opens

September 30, 1942: Brooklyn Homes opens

October 30, 1942: O'Donnell Heights opens; 304 units remain today.

January 30, 1944: Somerset Homes opens.

October 30, 1942: O'Donnell Heights opens. In 2004, 98 units were razed; in 2008, 498 units were razed; 304 units remain today

January 30, 1944: Somerset Homes opens; development raised in 2008-2009

September 29, 1946: Cherry Hill Homes opens

August 15, 1949: Under President Harry Truman's Fair Deal, the U.S. Housing Act of 1949 amends the 1937 Act to revive the federally-funded public housing program and provide funding for slum clearance and urban redevelopment programs. Baltimore City Council gave its unanimous consent to expand the public housing program by 10,000 dwellings.

November 16, 1952: Mayor D'Alesandro, Jr., proclaims the week of November 16th as Public Housing week. Posters with the inscription, 15 Years Devoted to Better Home and Community Life for Baltimoreans, are distributed.

January-December 1952: HABC's Application Office handles 11,364 requests for units

August 31, 1953: Cherry Hill Homes Extension I opens.

August 31, 1953: Cherry Hill Homes Extension I opens. HABC received the lowest net interest rate in the nation at 1.91 percent, for its $25,109,000 bond issue, which provided permanent financing for five of HABC's projects including Cherry Hill Homes Extension.

January 30, 1954: Claremont Homes, a vacant land project, opens.

February 28, 1956: Lafayette Courts, HABC's first high-rise building community with 805 units, opens.

April 28, 1956: Lexington Terrace opens.

May 30, 1956: Flag House opens.

May 30, 1956: Flag House opens; the development was razed in 2001 and was redeveloped as Albemarle Square HOPE VI project.

February 28, 1957: Cherry Hill Homes Extension II opens;

August 30, 1960: Westport Homes Extension opens;

November 30, 1963: George B. Murphy Homes opens.

September 1968: HABC Executive Director Robert Embry creates the first-ever Resident Advisory Board (RAB) in the nation to foster open communication between public housing residents and HABC.

December 31, 1969: Oswego Mall opens

January 31, 1970: Lakeview Towers open

May 31, 1970: Mt. Winans opens

June 1970: Mrs. Lillian Jones, a tenant of Lakeview Towers, became the first tenant Chairperson of RAB. She subsequently became the first tenant to sit on the Housing Authority Commission. The Lillian Jones Apartments will open in 2013.

August 31, 1971: McCulloh Homes Extension opens

March 31, 1972 : Broadway Homes opens

March 31, 1973: The West Twenty opens. It was renamed the J. Van Story Branch Sr., Apartments in April 2008.

August 31, 1973: Claremont Extension opens

May 31, 1974: Govans Manor and Bel-Park Towers open

July 31, 1974: Somerset Homes Extension opens

February 28, 1975: Wyman House opens

November 30, 1975: Rosemont/Dukeland opens

March 31, 1976: The Ellerslie opens

April 30, 1976: Monument East Apartments opens

August 31, 1976: The Brentwood opens

October 31, 1976: Hollander Ridge opens

May 31, 1978: Chase House opens

February 28, 1979: Bernard E. Mason opens

April 5, 1979:: The Emerson Julian opens

April 5, 1979: The Emerson Julian opens. It was razed in 1999 to make way for the Heritage Crossing HOPE VI redevelopment.

April 30, 1979: Albert Spencer opens

September 30, 1979: Lakeview Towers Extension opens

June 30, 1982: Primrose Place opens

October 31, 1983: C.K. Anderson opens

October 31, 1983: C.K. Anderson opens; development razed in 2005

December 31, 1983: Hollins House opens

February 29, 1984: Rosemont Tower opens

August 31, 1985: The Allendale opens

January 1, 1997: Uptown Apartments, a renovated scattered site property, opens

August 1, 1997:Arbor Oaks, privately managed rehabilitated developments open; the development includes 150 market rate units.

September 1, 1997: Midtown Apartments, which are renovated scattered site units, open

September 30, 1997: Stricker Street Apartments, a renovated scattered site property, opens

January 31, 1998: Pleasant View Gardens, which was the nation's first HOPE VI redevelopment site, opens. It includes 27 homeownership units.

June 1, 1998: Privately managed Monastery Garden Apartments open. It includes 26 market rate units

May 1, 1998: Montpellier's Choice, a privately managed rehabilitated development with 26 market rate units, opens. Hillside Park, privately managed rehabilitated development with 64 market rate units, opens

June 30, 2000: The Townes at the Terraces, a HOPE VI privately managed redevelopment opens. It includes 100 homeownership units

September 30, 2000: The Sr. Townes at the Terraces, a HOPE VI privately managed redevelopment, opens and includes 41 market rate units

September 30, 2003: Heritage Crossing, a HOPE VI privately managed redevelopment, opens and includes 185 market rate units

December 31, 2003: West Hills Square, replacement housing for demolished units under the Thompson Consent Decree, opens

April 12, 2004: Broadway Overlook, a HOPE VI privately managed redevelopment, opens and includes 46 market rate rental units and 36 homeownership units

October 23, 2004: Albermarle Square, a HOPE VI privately managed redevelopment, opens and includes 47 market rate rental units and 160 homeownership units

February 28, 2005: St. Ambrose, privately managed scattered site units that are replacement housing for demolished units under the Thompson Consent Decree, opens

December 31, 2006: Reservoir Hill, privately managed renovated scattered site units, opens

August 31, 2007: Sharp-Leadenhall, a privately managed scattered site units, opens

November 6, 2009: HABC receives $66 million in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funds. HABC used the ARRA funds to renovate 240 dilapidated scattered sites and 30 conventional public housing units located throughout the City.

July 31, 2010: HABC reaches a major milestone of a 99.25% public housing occupancy rate during the month of July, the highest percentage Baltimore has seen in more than a decade due in part to ARRA funded vacancy renovations and increased leasing, admissions and resident retention efforts.

January 31, 2011: Homes for Arundel, privately managed scattered site units that are replacement housing for demolished units under the Thompson Consent Decree, opens

July 6, 2012: The Thompson 58 Broadway Project receives a 2012 Housing Association of Nonprofit Developers (HAND) Innovation Award. In an effort to increase the quantity and quality of affordable and rental housing, HABC procures Homes for America, a non-profit housing corporation, to acquire, renovate and manage 58 properties.

September 4, 2012: Thompson Consent Decree is settled. After extensive negotiations, a settlement agreement was reached to resolve the Thompson v. HUD lawsuit. This settlement ends nearly two decades of litigation and court-ordered restrictions. The Housing Authority of Baltimore City (HABC) and the City of Baltimore worked cooperatively with both the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the Plaintiffs to bring about a favorable resolution.

September 28, 2012: Resident Services Incorporated hosts the 1st Annual Rising Star Golf Tournament and raises $50,000 to send HABC students to college.

December 13, 2012: HABC celebrates 75 years!

December 27, 2012: The McCulloh Homes replicated historic Boy and Girl statues are installed